How To Start a Fire With an Ice Block

One of the many cruel ironies of outdoor survival is that the conditions where you need fire most can make it the hardest to start. While the warm, dry summer months tend to give you plenty of dry tinder and firewood, snow-soaked winters make dry firestarting provisions scarce. That doesn't mean you can't start a fire, it just means you'll want to learn to adapt. In the following video, we see how you can use...
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FIRE!! Rugged, Reliable Firestarters For Survivalists and Outdoor Adventurers

Fire. Few things are more elemental to outdoor living. You need fire to stay warm, cook, boil water and, sometimes, just have a relaxing time with your buddies. Whether for survival or recreation, you should always have the ability to start a fire in the wilderness. That may mean rubbing a couple of sticks together frantically, but hopefully it means reaching in your pack for one of these spark-inducers. Survivor Firestarters Carry your spark and...
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Soto Pocket Torch Gets Even Fiercer

Just this past month, I was wishing I had a Soto Pocket Torch. It was cold and damp and I was attempting to light a fire. And attempting, and attempting. The wavering flame from my butane lighter just wasn't getting the job done and I knew I could have used the powerful, direct beam of the Soto. What I really could have used, though, is the new Pocket Torch XT. The XT, which should launch...
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How to build a fire using stuff found at IKEA.

Artist Helmut Smit decided to adopt the persona of a primitive human in need of making fire as he perused the aisles of IKEA. He found everything he needed, which included rope, a hanger, a wine rack, egg cup, trivet, napkins and 'floral embellishments'. The outcome he calls FLAMMA, meaning 'a basic need'. Fascinating, yes. Educational, absolutely. Cost effective, not so much.  FLAMMA from Helmut on Vimeo. Via.
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Soto Pocket Torch Turns Butane Lighter Into Windproof Torch

  One of my favorite products of Outdoor Retailer this summer was the Soto Pocket Torch. It's not that I ever really needed a pocket torch, but it would be damn cool to have. The torch cuts out the choice between the cheap, easy nature of the disposable lighter and the more powerful, windproof qualities of a Zippo-style lighter. Pop a disposable lighter inside, press the ignition and you have a strong (up to 2,300...
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The Making of Fire.

Featuring 'traditional' and 'non-traditional' methods, this how-to aims to be the ultimate compilation of everyone's favorite campground activity: FIRE! From kindling to fuel to finished, this one claims to have it all. Whatcha think? Is it complete? What else is there? What would you add?
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Start a Fire....With a Potato Chip.

The perfect potato chip: crispy, a bit oily, not too thick/not too thin...and apparently perfect for starting a fire. A single chip can burn for over three minutes, making it a perfect, inexpensive firestarter that takes up minimal space. Check out the video below: via photo.
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The Marshmallow Tree

  The Marshmallow Tree is a new product from the Pie Iron people. Basically, it's an iron fork that looks like a tree branch, which can accommodate 10 marshmallows. The picture really doesn't do it justice. It's really cute! You can find it at retailer such as Gander Mountain and on-line at Jack's Country Store for about 10 bucks.
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Solar Power Firestarter

The Sunlighter Solar Lighter is an interesting firestarter that uses a large mirror to focus sunlight into a single point onto your tinder. While this seems like a pretty good tool to have in a pinch, it begs the question: how much preparedness is too much? After all, the only role I can foresee for this device is a back-up to the firestarter in your emergency kit. And a big, bulky one that is not that reliable (nighttime...
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A bow drill primer

The bow drill is one of the most primitive fire-starting devices. It's also one of the most difficult fire-starting devices to learn, master and work with any consistency. Be that as it may, the technology and technique of the thing have always intrigued me. That's why I was excited to find this comprehensive website that lays it all out there, with both all the materials and great instructional videos.
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How To: Altoids Tin Emergency Candle.

Using old, melted candles, some matches, and a recycled altoids tin to keep everything dry and organized, create an emergency candle for camping, hiking, canoeing, or simply to keep around the house. Materials: tin can/soup can candles matchbook matchescrayon for color hot glue gun duct tape  
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Swedish FireSteel; Don’t leave home without it.

Developed for the Swedish Department of Defense, the Swedish FireSteel will flash a 3,000° C spark that will produce a fire at any altitude and in any weather. You can even submerge the thing in water for days and it’ll still produce a spark. Light My Fire's ‘scout’ model produces about 3,000 strikes, whereas their ‘army’ model produces 12,000. (I’ve heard the best results are achieved with the ‘army’ models.) Go to Light My Fire...
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Build a Better Campfire.

 Whether for warmth, marshmallow-roasting, or effigy burning, campfire building is essential for the uncooped. Here's a few tips to ensure success everytime.Prepare a safe fire site Building the fire          Making a fireplace for cookingExtingushing the fire
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Survival Tip: How To Start a Fire With A Battery and Copper Wire.

Tuck a small piece of copper wire in your pack, just in case. For batteries, grab one from your flashlight or mobile phone. Gather some tinder, then following these directions: "1. Straighten the copper wire. Next twist the middle of the wire. You should get the twisted part to be shaped into coil-like. 2. Now, place both ends of the wire to both ends of the batteries. Quickly let the coil come in contact with...
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Nature's fire starter

Cattails, which grow in wet wastelands and wetlands nearly everywhere in North America, except the extreme northern reaches of the continent, offers one of the best fire starters naturally available. And, it's available nearly year-round.It's the fuzzy, cottony pollen in the tubular pods at the top of the stalk that you want. When dried, that stuff will go up like gasoline with the slightest spark.As an ultimate, naturally available, survival tool, cattail pollen is available...
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Grilliput Portable Camping Grill (only 10" long!)

I do love minimalism, and this sleek, lightweight portable grill is form v. function to the mostest.  The Grilliput Features:  All stainless steel constructionDisassembles to the size of a 12" ruler, storing within itself, taking up very little space in your pack.10" x 9.125" cooking area Sets up in fewer than five minutesSelf-cleaning design 29.99 from Rel.com
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How to start a campfire with one match everytime: use a candle

Here's how I conserve matches when I'm starting a campfire:  When you're ready to light your campfire, (after you've got your teepee or lean-to built), light a small candle first, then light your kindling.  Then you don't have to waste any more matches if the first one doesn't work.  Just light a little piece of kindling with the candle and try again.  Make sure that once the fire is started you take your candle away...
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How To Extinguish a Campfire (Safely and Effectively).

When the evening activities are over, and the s'mores supplies put away (or totally consumed), it's essential to extinguish the campfire. It is never safe to leave a fire unattended, so be wise and put it out.1. Stop adding fuel about a half-hour before you're ready for your fire to be through.2. Allow the remaining wood to most burn up, then use a long stick to stir the coals so as to evenly distribute, and...
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More DIY Camp Stoves.

Zen Stove's Open Flame Alcohol Stove: Vegetable Steamer Camp Stove:Emergency Heating Stove:  
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DIY Camp Stoves.

The wildly popular soda can stove: The Penny Alcohol Stove:Tin Can Sterno Stove: 
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